The purple toga

925 West Georgia St. #600, BDO Canada, accounting office, Vancouver

Julius Caesar was a highly original master propagandist whose bullshit tactics matched his master military leader skills. He came from Rome. The Eternal City had produced general after general — imperators. He would not be the first to march on The City. He was perhaps the truest of Romans. In him, great ambition was tempered by a sense of civic duty. Even in breaking the rules, he retained some semblance of their spirit. After his assassination, when the “emperor” label was being kicked around, most emperors respected a superficial Senate as a way of honoring the legacy. When you grow up in Rome, legacy matters. Size matters. Money matters. And perhaps most of all, the People matter. Julius Caesar understood the value of demagoguery; after all, he had to get the common man in his soldier’s garb to follow him to the ends of the empire and back.

When Julius Caesar was murdered, envy and jealousy won out over logic and fair play. The truth was, Caesar had won. What right had these small men to then play a role in history — in the Continuum itself — by breaking it at a crucial juncture point. Had Caesar lived, he could have reigned like a king, giving Rome a fresh start in an opportune manner. He would have been a king sensitive to the needs of his people. He would have been loved by them, I suspect.

Julius Caesar the general never knew the fruits of victory. But in his lifespan we can see the mistakes that were made, the successful moves that were made, and all else besides. From his kidnapping by pirates, to the end at the flashing of the knives, it all comes down to us from long ago to remind us that history, while not repeating, often rhymes. And in Donald Trump we may have a man who, under the right circumstances, would cross his own Rubicon in the Potomac River of Washington, D.C. An imperial Donald would be something to see; now, that’s entertainment, as the TV ads proclaim!

Era 2 — The giant city — 150 B.C – 349 A.D.

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